14 Amazing Waterfalls in Connecticut

Nothing beats a waterfall for putting things into perspective. One of life’s most pleasurable delights is standing in front of a big flow of water roaring over a cliff to its last, serene resting place.

If you’re worried, concentrating on the soothing sound of a waterfall can help you relax. It’s no surprise that many people are willing to trek (often for miles upwards) to see one.

Connecticut has a wide range of these amazing natural beauties to offer visitors. Numerous visit-worthy falls across the Nutmeg State range from thundering falls that generate choppy waters asking to be kayaked to trickling cascades that finish in the most beautiful bathing holes.

Waterfalls in Connecticut

Don’t know where to begin? Don’t worry; this list of the Best Waterfalls in Connecticut and will help you focus your search.

Buttermilk Falls 

Buttermilk Falls 

Buttermilk Falls, located in the picturesque hamlet of Plymouth, is one of Connecticut’s most beautiful waterfalls. The waterfall is commonly referred to as a “hidden gem,” and there is usually just a small amount of foot traffic at any given time.

To get to this splendor, hike Buttermilk Falls Trail for a little more than a half-mile.

Buttermilk Falls is a 55-foot waterfall with a spectacular view. Hikers and sightseers have remarked that standing at the top of the falls may allow you to overlook the actual grandeur of the falls.

If you can make it to the bottom of the falls (very gently), you’ll be rewarded with a breathtaking vista of this hidden jewel. There’s also plenty of room surrounding the falls and pathways to rest or have a picnic with a stunning view.

Kent Falls

Kent Falls

If you were a kid who enjoyed watching the slinky go down the stairs, you’d enjoy this waterfall. Kent Falls State Park is home to this stair-like gentle plunge that spans for a quarter-mile.

The mist from the cascading waterfall can be felt if you get close enough. Please note that once the park’s parking lot is full, the park will be closed to new visitors. It will reopen once there are at least 10 empty parking spaces in the lot.

Enders Falls

Enders Falls

Enders Falls is best viewed from its vantage point at the top. This mesmerizing phenomenon comprises five different waterfalls and is located in Enders State Forest near Granby. Its beauty is ethereal and completely seductive.

Visitors can climb from the first set of falls, a six-foot-tall cascade of whooshing beauty, to the next three mild plunges on one of the state’s top waterfall hikes. It culminates with one of Connecticut’s most spectacular waterfalls.

This fifth and final Enders fall will demand you to get your camera out and start taking pictures. It is made up of two drops that drop 15 feet to an appealing pool below.

During the summer, each of them has swimming holes that are popular with visitors. The swimming hole at the bottom of the fifth falls is less busy than the others.

Chapman Falls 

Chapman Falls 

Many people consider Chapman Falls to be one of Connecticut’s most beautiful and intriguing waterfalls. Devil’s Hopyard State Park is home to Chapman Falls, which is located in East Haddam.

What’s the significance of the foreboding moniker? According to legend, Satan used to wander along the falls. When his tail became wet one day, he became enraged and marched his hooves over sections of the falls, leaving unique scars on the rocks that molded its location.

Others say it was formed by centuries of water running over the rocks. Which version to trust is entirely up to you.

Mill Pond Falls

Mill Pond Falls

We’re heading to see the “smallest natural waterfall in the United States” now that you’ve had a chance to cool off (if you’re on a road trip during the summer). Mills Pond Falls is only 12 feet tall.

Take a stroll around the waterfall’s flower-framed lagoon and share a kiss on the bridge. Alternatively, simply snap a stunning photograph. It’s lovely even in the winter. And the viewing deck will allow you to appreciate it!

Wadsworth Big and Little Falls

Wadsworth Big and Little Falls

Wadsworth Falls State Park is the place to go if you’re seeking quiet. This natural beauty is home to two stunning waterfalls, appropriately titled Big Falls and Little Falls.

Wadsworth Big Falls, which is broader than tall and boasts the highest flow of any undammed waterfall in New England, is accessible via easy hiking paths.

It’s a beautiful sight to behold, but visitors are advised not to spend too much time at this Middletown waterfall.

Because swimming and picnics are prohibited here, most visitors spend their time at Wadsworth Little Falls, the falls’ lesser brother.

The Little Falls, about a half-mile away, is less strong but as enchanting. They also have a beach and a natural swimming pool.

Great Falls 

Great Falls 

Great Falls is a waterfall in Falls Village, Canaan, Connecticut, built by the Housatonic River. Because of its sheer force, it is often regarded as one of Connecticut’s most popular waterfalls. Its strength has been compared to that of Niagara Falls by some!

Hikers and sightseers will enjoy this 60-foot forceful waterfall, and many individuals have expressed astonishment while admiring the natural structure.

Because the waterfall is dam-controlled and delivers water to Canaan and Falls Village, the amount of water that flows over the falls may fluctuate from time to time.

You’re in luck if you only want to see the falls without taking the long hike. The parking lot is within a short distance from the waterfall. You can always head to the Appalachian Trail in Falls Village if you want to embark on a long journey after seeing the falls.

You can even attempt kayaking or tubing on the Housatonic River if you’re feeling adventurous.

Campbell Falls

Campbell Falls

Campbell Falls State Park Reserve in Norfolk is where you’ll discover nature at its most beautiful. In this woodland paradise, visitors will not be harassed with concession stands or other services. 

Instead, they’ll come across a hidden jewel of a waterfall, which is just waiting for them to enjoy its beauty.

Jump in the cool water, stroll along the woodland pathways, and relax while taking in the breathtaking surroundings. To make the experience linger longer, bring a picnic. We assure you you won’t be disappointed.

Dean’s Ravine Falls 

Dean’s Ravine Falls 

While you’re in Canaan, pay a visit to Dean’s Ravine Falls, one of Connecticut’s most beautiful waterfalls. This waterfall has a reputation for being beautiful, but it may be overshadowed because it is located near Great Falls.

But don’t dismiss this waterfall; it’s a sight to behold! It’s even more stunning when frozen!

This lovely 50-foot waterfall, formed along Reed Brook in Canaan, is flanked by hemlocks and a little rough (but still a sight to see). Depending on the season, and overlook a short walk from the parking area allows you to see the water rushing down the waterfall.

You may always go to the Appalachian Trail, only a few miles from the ravine if you’re looking for additional adventure after visiting the waterfall.

Roaring Brook Falls

Roaring Brook Falls

Roaring Brook Falls is the tallest waterfall in Connecticut, falling 80 feet from Roaring Brook Park, a tranquil location excellent for introspection.

The Roaring Brook Falls Trail, which is filled with ponds and marsh areas, is a must-see. At times, the 1.4-mile trail can be quite crowded. On what is called a moderate hike to the falls, be prepared for a challenge.

Yantic Falls 

Yantic Falls 

Yantic Falls is the spot to go if you want to see a gorgeous waterfall with a lot of history. Yantic Falls is a 40-foot waterfall in Norwich that is part natural and part artificial. The falls pour water into a narrow canyon, which feeds the Yantic River.

Indian Leap Falls is another name for Yantic Falls. According to plaques in the park, it was a favorite campground of the Mohegan Indians in the 17th century.

The Mohegans were at war with the Narragansetts in 1643. During the battle, legend has it that a troop of Narragansetts unwittingly reached the high bluff of the falls.

Rather than submit, the Narragansetts attempted to leap but fell to their deaths. The falls were also important in Norwich’s industrial development.

The falls are a wonderful sight to view in addition to having a rich history. Many people prefer to snap pictures on the railroad bridge that runs over the falls, and there’s also a pedestrian bridge across from the falls where you can see the falls in all their devouring grandeur.

Aspetuck Falls

Aspetuck Falls

A waterfall is the one thing that could make an already gorgeous village even more so. It’s no surprise that the small community of New Preston is so appealing.

This charming village, located on the northwestern outskirts of Washington, is home to one of the state’s most beautiful waterfalls. It also has a few unique boutique shops and modest but delicious eateries.

Aspetuck Falls, which plunge 20 feet through the village center and into a spectacular, black gorge below, slowly smash their way towards the Aspetuck River. Stone ruins dot the river’s stony banks, adding to the area’s allure.

Spruce Brook Falls

Spruce Brook Falls

Multiple plunges and waterfalls carve the rocky topography of Naugatuck State Forest. If you count each of the little droplets in this woodland wonderland, you might reach six or seven.

Spruce Brook’s main and greatest falls plunge 15 feet into a foamy pool below. Those who continue to follow the hiking trails downstream will find even more cascades, as well as a tiny natural waterslide and several rock and water pools.

The best views are from above, a reward for anyone brave enough to walk to the upper Spruce Brook Falls, which is occasionally steep, slippery, and exhausting.

Blackledge Falls

Blackledge Falls

You’ll never guess what color the cliff behind this stunning cascade is. Glastonbury, about a 25-minute drive southeast of Hartford, is home to Blackledge Falls.

Hikers may enjoy a beautiful vista and the soothing sound of the river as they escape the hustle and bustle of the city.

This secret gem can be located deep beneath Glastonbury’s thick trees. It gets its name from the Blackledge River, which pours over a cliff and into a shallow rock pool below.

The 25-foot drop formed by this waterfall is both dramatic and relaxing, despite its small size. This may be Connecticut’s most calm waterfall.

Final Words

We appreciate you taking the time to read our post about the 14 Amazing Waterfalls in Connecticut. Kindly notify us if you have any additional comments or questions in the section below. We’d be delighted to hear from you.

Recommended reading: 18 Best Lakes in Connecticut for Kayaking and Campaigns

Waterfalls in Connecticut

  1. Buttermilk Falls
  2. Kent Falls
  3. Enders Falls
  4. Chapman Falls
  5. Mill Pond Falls
  6. Wadsworth Big and Little Falls
  7. Great Falls
  8. Campbell Falls
  9. Dean’s Ravine Falls
  10. Roaring Brook Falls
  11. Yantic Falls
  12. Aspetuck Falls
  13. Spruce Brook Falls
  14. Blackledge Falls

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